Japan said Wednesday that any attempt by South Korea to revise the 2015 deal would make relations “inexperienced,” with Japanese Foreign Minister Taro Kono saying the deal was the result of “legitimate negotiations.” A senior U.S. State Department official said the deal was especially important in the face of the threat of North Korea`s nuclear and ballistic missile program. Second, Kishida`s statement contains Prime Minister Shinzo Abe`s “most sincere apology and remorse” as Prime Minister of Japan. This is a direct response to some vocal critics who have dismissed the 1993 Kono Declaration and the 1995 Murayama Declaration as an expression of the personal feelings of these leaders and therefore not as an official apology from the government. In exchange for Japan`s new apology and a contribution of 1 billion yen, South Korea should not only put the subject aside as a diplomatic wedge between the two countries, but also remove the Seoul statue. According to the Korea Herald, in addition to the statues of Busan and Seoul, which are expelled by their proximity to Japanese diplomatic representations, there are 37 similar commemorative statues throughout the country. All of this casts hope that the agreement, once described as a “definitive and irreversible solution,” will baffle the issue of comfort women in Japan-South Korea relations, as it did before the December 28, 2015 agreement. A future bilateral agreement will be particularly difficult for both governments, given the difficulties encountered in implementing the 2015 agreement. But while Abe hailed a new era in bilateral relations and his foreign minister called the deal historic, South Korean President Park Geun-hye`s reaction has been significantly colder. . . .